Monthly Archives: January 2017

Another Chevelle Restoration Project For Poor Mans Restoration

Another Chevelle Restoration Project For Poor Mans Restoration

Another Chevelle Restoration Project SOLD
For Poor Mans Restoration

 

 


A Rusted Junk Project: 1966 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu

1966 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu

1966 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu

One of the most common comments I hear when a new project rolls into the shop is “that’s nothing but rusted junk!” Of course it has been said, “beauty is in the eyes of the beholder,” and that is certainly the case when it comes to auto restoration projects. Rust is the number one enemy of classic cars. Collision damage, unless severe, is easier to repair than cancerous rust. A small rust spot on the outside of a vehicle might be the tell-tell sign of a wide-spread attack of the car panel on the back side.

Floor Boards Completely Gone In This Malibu Due To Rust

Floor Boards Completely Gone In This Malibu Due To Rust

Rust is caused by moisture and road grime, mud, and dirt act like a sponge giving the moisture a home to cling to. Moisture will stay in its home way after enviornmental conditions may have shooed away other moisture on and around the vehicle. Rust can and will spread from these rust hideaways much like a human cancer. In fact, most auto enthusiasts refer to rust as cancer. Left untreated, rust can spread throughout the vehicle and become a serious safety issue.

Looking back over some previous restoration projects, I recalled some of the comments made in my notes: rusted car, rusty chevy s10, chevy frame rust, rusted 1933 chevy truck, rusted old chevy, 57 chevy bel air rusted, rusted barn find, rusty chevy pickups, old rusty classic chevy trucks, rusty chevy truck. Rust, it seems, is a common theme in all restoration projects.

Older cars have more rust than the cars manufactured today but if you think about it some; it is because older cars had more metal in them. Todays cars use plastics, fiberglass, aluminum and a bunch of other non-rusting parts which is good but which also has its disadvantages. But cars and trucks manufactured in the past were much more rugged and maybe that is why classic car buffs call them “real cars” and “real trucks.”

If you have your old classic stored in your garage just waiting for the “someday” you start the restoration, the rust is still there – slowly spreading and doing its thing – eating your car. If you really plan on having something to work with “someday”, pull it out of the garage and look in and out for rust. Clean off all the dirt and grime you can find and be sure to check the most difficult to get to spots because that is where you are most likely to find rust that will eventually give you expensive problems.

The Chevelle shown in this article is not for sale. It was used only to show a classic example of rust damage that Poor Mans Restoration deals with on some projects. See more car restoration projects.

 

Glen Thomas